Special Reports

The Right to Health and Problems Related to Exercise this Right within the Penitentiary System of Georgia Special Report Covering 2009 and the First Half of 2010

A serious lesson the society could have clearly learnt from the past century in terms of healthcare is that it is no longer possible for the public health system to continue ignoring healthcare in the penitentiary as the later is part and parcel thereof. Spread of tuberculosis, HIV infection, virus hepatitis and other serious and transmittable diseases as well as the understanding of the fact that penitentiary establishments are unfit to accommodate persons with drug related and mental problems have raised the matter of healthcare in penitentiary system to a topical issue and made a radical reform of the entire system a priority on the agenda. In most countries throughout the world, societies try to deal with this serious health challenge on their own ways. Any national strategy for addressing health problems in the penitentiary system requires elaboration and implementation of a policy directed at ensuring equivalent health services to persons in penitentiary establishments.

A successful healthcare system in the penitentiary significantly benefits the public health system and society at large. In particular, it impedes nation-wide spread of diseases, augments general good health and convinces the society of the fact that improving one’s own health and wellbeing is important for others’ health and well being, which, eventually, positively affects public health status and plays a serious role in achieving a principle entitled “health for all”.

The Right to Health and Problems Related to Exercise this Right Within the Penitentiary System of Georgia Special Report Covering 2009 and the First Half of 2010

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